The only ecclesiastical residence on the upper rhine

Bruchsal Palace

Bruchsal Palace, stucco in the Chamber Music Hall; photo: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Andrea Rachele
Festival hall in the side wing

The Kammermusiksaal

(Chamber Music Hall)

The Kammermusiksaal (Chamber Music Hall) looks light, welcoming and elegant in mellow yellow. It was designed at the end of the 18th century in the neoclassical style – and is unique in the palace. The hall is in the chamber wing, which takes its name from the fiscal authority, the 'Chamber'.

Bruchsal Palace, Chamber Music Hall; photo: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Arnim Weischer

Stucco in white and gold: the Chamber Music Hall.

Elegant neoclassical

A wealth of filigree, flat stucco decoration covers the walls and ceilings: playful yet symmetrical ornamental elements are entwined in strictly structured wall panels. The garlands, leaf tendrils and rosettes provided are reminiscent of ancient art. After the Rococo, this transitional style introduced Classicism in France from circa 1760. This period is named after Louis XVI, who was then King of France: Louis-Seize.

Modernization

The hall's role is evident in the stucco decoration: musical instruments are entwined in hanging garlands. There was a Music Hall here even at the time of Prince-Bishop Schönborn, when it was a two-storey construction encircled by a gallery. The ceiling fresco glorified the Prince-Bishop as a patron of architecture and the arts. Damian August von Limburg-Stirum, a member of the government since 1770, had a false ceiling inserted in 1776 and commissioned Joachim Günther to redesign the space

Bruchsal Palace, Chamber Music Hall; photo: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Arnim Weischer

Playful but in strictly structured panels – the decorative elements in the Kammermusiksaal (Chamber Music Hall) are designed in the neoclassical Louis-Seize style.

Bruchsal Palace, stucco in the Chamber Music Hall; photo: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Arnim Weischer

Garlands with wind instruments.

Music at the court

Initially, the musicians playing at court were primarily amateurs. Under the Prince-Bishops Hutten and Limburg-Stirum, numerous professional musicians attended and the orchestra increased to around 50 people, including singers. Limburg-Stirum was a patron of the court musicians in particular. As a result, the modernization of the Kammermusiksaal (Chamber Music Hall) became his most important construction project at Bruchsal Palace - otherwise he was quite thrifty.

Bruchsal Palace, Chamber Music Hall; photo: Staatliche Schlösser und Gärten Baden-Württemberg, Arnim Weischer

The Chamber Music Hall is available for hire.

The hall following its reconstruction

Following destruction of the Palace in the Second World War, the Kammermusiksaal (Chamber Music Hall) was the first significant room at Bruchsal Palace to be restored in 1955. However, for reasons of expense, much of the gilding on the ornamental elements could not be restored to its original state. The hall continues to serve its purpose today. The Bruchsal cultural circle regularly holds the Bruchsal Palace Concerts here – a high profile chamber music series.

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